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Jay’s Jams: The Wood Brothers, Sing About It

June’s Jam of the Month, “Sing About It”, comes from the Wood Brothers, an eclectic folk/blues group. Since this is the inaugural post of Jay’s Jams, it seemed only appropriate to choose a song that speaks to why I love singing and music so much.

If you get too worried
What you ought to do is sing
If you get worried
What you ought to do is sing
If you get worried
What you ought to do is sing
Sing about your trouble and it just might pass

If you get lost
What you ought to do is sing
If you get lost
What you ought to do is sing
If you get lost
What you ought to do is sing
Sing about your trouble and it just might pass
Sing about your trouble and it just might pass

Sing about joy
Sing about love and hopin’ it lasts
Sing about your trouble
And it just might pass
Just might pass

If you get broken
What you ought to do is sing
If you get broken
What you ought to do is sing
If you get broken
What you ought to do is sing
Sing about your trouble and it just might pass
Sing about your trouble and it just might pass

Sing about joy
Sing about love and hopin’ it lasts
Sing about your trouble
And it just might pass
Just might pass

Reflection

Singing is a powerfully therapeutic activity. When I am melancholy for whatever reason, listening to music or singing on my own is what I most need. The Hasidic teachers recognized this human need.

The Hasidic movement’s major contribution to the evolution of Jewish thought was the change in emphasis from an esoteric philosophical mysticism to a human psychological mysticism. In other words, Hasidism focuses on internal dynamics rather than external divinity.

The early mystics thought music had the power to change the divine, and therefore the world. Singing could literally change reality – “sing about your trouble, and it just might pass.”

Later Hasidic mystics focused on changing the human soul, the divinity within. Singing is a way to connect to your innermost self. “If you get worried, if you get lost, if you get broken, sing!”

Rate this song below. And tell me what you think about the mystical or psychological power of music in the comments section!

 


Jay’s Jams post at the beginning of every month. Every song I post will be accompanied by a reflection, often but not always connected to Judaism, which elucidates or complicates the meaning I draw from the song. Occasional contributors will supplement my own favorite jams.